Berenson & Associates, PC
Hablamos EspaƱol
Compassionate Advocates For Personal Injury Victims

nursing home abuse Archives

Elder abuse continues to go underreported

As the baby boomer population ages, more and more New Mexico families have difficult decisions to make. Whether one spouse is struggling to provide the necessary care for his or her mate or it is impractical to care for an elderly parent, some form of outside care is a likely choice. Depending on the level of needs of the individual and the financial resources of the family, residence in an elder care facility or some form of home health assistance are possible options. Unfortunately, neither choice ensures safety from the scourge of elder abuse.

Rising demand for elder care and low wages make recipe for abuse

An aging population in New Mexico and nationwide means that society will have to make elder care a priority. By 2050, demographers predict that 88 million people will be over age 65. That figure represents a doubling of the current elderly population. Caring for the elderly has always posed challenges, and the nursing home industry has long been prone to corruption and abuse. The prospects do not look good for the future.

Nursing home abuse victim may have faced multiple assaults

New Mexico residents who are worried about nursing home abuse should be aware of a case where an incapacitated woman gave birth in a health care facility in Arizona. A medical exam found that she had suffered sexual assault. Her attorneys are seeking a settlement for the victim and her parents with the intention of going to court if an agreement can not be reached. A separate case was opened against the health care facility's nurse, who was charged with sexual assault and vulnerable adult abuse after a paternity test matched his DNA to the baby.

How health care fraud can affect nursing home residents

Improper, inflated or unlawful medical billing practices are forms of health care fraud that could affect the quality of life of anyone receiving nursing home care in New Mexico. It's nursing home residents with their care funded partially or completely by Medicare, Medicaid or private insurance who are especially susceptible to this type of health care fraud.

Nursing home fines down under Trump administration

When President Trump entered office in January 2017, the nursing home industry lobbied his administration to change the way the government fines facilities that have harmed or endangered residents. The pressure worked, and the Trump administration rolled back regulations that were implemented by the Obama administration. As a result, fines against non-compliant nursing homes in New Mexico and elsewhere have dropped sharply.

Congress probes nursing home abuse

Many people in New Mexico are deeply concerned about the threat of nursing home abuse or neglect, especially if their own loved ones are cared for in a facility. U.S. Congress is looking into the problem across the country after media attention has shed new light on the types of abuses that people can suffer inside nursing homes. In particular, a woman in a coma for 14 years gave birth at a nursing home, proving that she was subject to rape and sexual assault while in the facility.

How to spot signs of nursing home neglect, abuse

New Mexico residents depend on nursing home staff to provide competent, professional care to their loved ones. However, it doesn't always turn out that way. Incidences of nursing home abuse and neglect are relatively common throughout the United States, and knowing the signs can help protect family members from serious harm.

Protecting loved ones from nursing home abuse

With millions of people in New Mexico and across the U.S. living in long-term care facilities, the possibility of abuse is a serious one. A CNN investigation found that between 2013 and 2016, the federal government cited more than 1,000 nursing homes either for failing to prevent cases of rape, sexual assault and sexual abuse at their facilities or for mishandling those cases. Of those, nearly 100 were cited multiple times.

Birth by disabled woman in nursing home suggests sexual assault

New Mexico families who entrust their loved ones to nursing facilities have been unsettled by the news out of a neighboring state about a woman in a vegetative state giving birth in a nursing home. The 29-year-old woman had been in nursing care since she was a toddler. Her conditions included quadriplegia, persistent pneumonia and seizures. According to anonymous sources in touch with staff members at Hacienda HealthCare, the woman would not have been able to defend herself from sexual advances or communicate her condition.

Learn What Our Attorneys Can Do for You.
Email Us For A Response

Schedule a Consultation With An Attorney

Bold labels are required.

Contact Information
disclaimer.

The use of the Internet or this form for communication with the firm or any individual member of the firm does not establish an attorney-client relationship. Confidential or time-sensitive information should not be sent through this form.

close

Privacy Policy

Berenson & Associates, PC
415 6th St NW
Albuquerque, NM 87102

Phone: 505-227-8315
Fax: 505-243-4405
Map & Directions

Review Us
We would love to hear from you about your experience with us.
Review Us