For many people in New Mexico, driving on Halloween can result in severe car accidents and the injuries that follow. As people go out to Halloween parties and spend the night trick-or-treating, they could face an escalated risk on the roads. The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration reports that Halloween night is the most dangerous time for drunk driving. More people are killed in DWI-related crashes between 6 p.m. on Oct. 31 and 6 a.m. on Nov. 1 than at any other time of the year.

Between 2012 and 2016, 44 percent of all those killed in auto accidents on Halloween night were linked to crashes that involved drunk drivers. In 2016, nearly half of all traffic fatalities on Halloween involved young people between the ages of 21 and 34, often traveling to and from Halloween parties. There was one bright spot in the statistics: In 2016, no pedestrians were killed in these Halloween crashes, meaning that young trick-or-treaters were spared.

Taking some safety precautions can help keep Halloween scares confined to haunted houses and horror movies. Before going out for a party, everyone should make plans to get home safely; this can include a designated sober driver, public transit or a ride-hailing service. In addition, friends can take action to prevent their friends from getting behind the wheel while impaired. All drivers can keep their eyes open and stay alert for pedestrians, especially children, on the road.

When people are hit by a negligent, drunk or distracted driver, they could face severe injuries and lifelong disabilities as a result. A personal injury lawyer may help people injured in a car crash due to someone else’s negligence to pursue compensation for their current and future medical bills, lost wages and other damages.